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    Appendix 17.2. Cryptic speciation in selected Arctic terrestrial and marine species.

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    Breeding bird species in the different geographic zones of the low and high Arctic

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    Appendix 10.2. Data on diversity of lichens and lichenicolous fungi in the Arctic and separately for the sectors of the Arctic (Beringia, Canada, North Atlantic, European Russia, W and E Siberia) and the single floristic provinces: numbers of species, numbers of species in the low and high Arctic, percentage of species with respective growth form (crustose, squamulose, foliose, fruticose), the estimated number of missing crustose lichen species (explanations below), percentage of species on the respective substrate on which the lichen species grow, and rarity of species within and outside the Arctic.

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    Appendix 9.8 The thirty moss families of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago with reference number (Ireland et al. 1987) in brackets. Number of species in each family, number of genus in family, and number of species in each genus are given. Species-rich genera and families are highlighted in grey.

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    Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) are regions of ocean space encompassing coastal areas from river basins and estuaries to the seaward boundary of continental shelves and the seaward margins of coastal current systems. Fifty of them have been identified. They are relatively large regions (200 000 km2 or more) characterized by distinct bathymetry, hydrography, productivity and trophically dependent populations. The LME approach uses five modules: 1. productivity module considers the oceanic variability and its effect on the production of phyto and zooplankton 2. fish and fishery module concerned with the sustainability of individual species and the maintenance of biodiversity 3. pollution and ecosystem health module examines health indices, eutrophication, biotoxins, pathology and emerging diseases 4. socio-economic module integrates assessments of human forcing and the long-term sustainability and associated socio-economic benefits of various management measures, and 5. governance module involves adaptive management and stakeholder participation.” Source: <a href="http://www.fao.org/fishery/topic/3440/en" target="_blank">Ecosystems</a> Reference: Sherman, K. and Hempel, G. (Editors) 2009. The UNEP Large Marine Ecosystem Report: A perspective on changing conditions in LMEs of the world’s Regional Seas. UNEP Regional Seas Report and Studies No. 182. United Nations Environment Programme. Nairobi, Kenya. Data available from: <a href="http://lme.edc.uri.edu/" target="_blank">LMEs of the world</a> Updated shape file - 2014

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    Appendix 20. Arctic indigenous languages status and trends. Data used to compile the information for the table was collected from both census records and academic sources, each of the CAFF countries and indigenous peoples organizations (Permanent Participants to the Arctic Council) where possible also provided statistical information.

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    Appendix 9.6 Species list of liverworts of Svalbard (Frisvoll & Elvebakk 1996) with nomenclature of families after Damsholt (2002).

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    Appendix 17.3. Phylogeographic and population genetics studies of selected Arctic species.

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    Marine fishes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas (AOAS).

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    Appendix 6.1.1. Freshwater and diadromous fish species by area of occurrence within the High Arctic, Low Arctic and sub-Arctic. Appendix 6.1.2. Freshwater and diadromous fishes of the Palearctic and Nearctic regions. Appendix 6.1.3. Occurrence of freshwater and diadromous fishes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of the seven geographical regions referred to in the main text. Appendix 6.1.4. Freshwater and diadromous fish species status summary for species assessed at some level of risk by country or region