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    Maximum LTA (long-term average) August air temperatures for the circumpolar region, with ecoregions used in the analysis of the SAFBR outlined in black. Source for temperature layer: Fick and Hijmans (2017). State of the Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report - Chapter 5 - Page 89 - Figure 5-5

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    Abiotic drivers in North America, including (a) long-term average maximum August air temperature, (b) spatial distribution of ice sheets in the last glaciation of the North American Arctic region, and (c) geological setting of bedrock geology underlying North America. Panel (a) source Fick and Hijmans (2017). Panel (b) adapted from: Physical Geology by Steve Earle, freely available at http://open.bccampus.ca. Panel (c) source: Geogratis. State of the Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report - Chapter 5 - Page 86 - Figure 5-3

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    Appendix 11. Taxa of hetorotrophic protists reported from Foxe Basin, Canada (FB), Disko Bay, W Greenland (DB; Vors 1993), the Greenland Sea (GLS; Ikävalko & Gradinger 1997) and Northern Baffin Bay, Canada (NBB; Lovejoy et al. 2002).

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    Number of terrestrial mammal species occupying low and high Arctic zones in each of the circumpolar Arctic regions. Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna, CAFF 2013 - Akureyri . Arctic Biodiversity Assessment. Status and Trends in Arctic biodiversity. - Mammals(Chapter 3) page 83

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    Orgination of macrophyte data (axis labels should be changed from Dim1 to Axis I and from Dim2 to Axis II), with symbols/colours differing by region. State of the Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report - Chapter 3 - Page 55 - Figure 4-24

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    The Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus tundrius) population in South Greenland has been monitored annually 1981-2018 (except 1993 and 2004). At visits to known breeding sites we recorded presence/absence of territorial falcons as well as their breeding outputs (number of eggs and/or young). The file named S_Greenland_Peregrine_monitoring_data.csv contains the raw data from 725 site checks (sometimes several per site per year). The file named S_Greenland_Summary_occupancy_and_productivity.csv contains a summary of the raw data, providing annual estimates of occupancy, productivity and average brood size. The respective ReadMe files specify the contents.

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    The Arctic Falcon Specialist Group (AFSG) is an informal network of biologists with a research focus on Arctic-breeding peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) and gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus). AFSG was established to enhance the coordination and collaboration on the monitoring of the two Arctic falcon species and the initial joint effort was to compile the first overview of Arctic falcon monitoring sites, present trends for long-term occupancy and productivity, and summarize information describing abundance, distribution, phenology and health of the two species – based on data for 24 falcon monitoring sites across the Arctic. The analyses were published in the journal Ambio (Franke et al. 2020) as a contribution to the terrestrial Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Programme (CBMP) defined by Arctic Council’s Biodiversity Working Group (Christensen et al. 2018). The data compiled from across the Arctic for the analyses by Franke et al. (2020) are here made available for wider usage and comparisons. However, for the analyses in the Ambio paper, some filtering procedures were applied (e.g. time series shorter than 10 sampling years, or fewer than 10 territories monitored), excluding some of the original data that are now made available in this dataset. In addition, some co-authors preferred either to conduct separate uploads of respective data, or declined the invitation to make the data publicly available (see attached map overview of monitoring sites); hence this dataset does not exactly match the data analysed by Franke et al. (2020). This data set contains the annual estimates of peregrine and gyrfalcon ‘occupancy’ and ‘productivity’ in respective monitoring sites; for definitions as well a discussion of challenges in determining, interpreting and comparing those figures across sites with different sampling procedures please consult Franke et al. (2020 and 2017). The file named Arctic falcons monitoring data - AFSG 2020.csv contains the annual estimates of occupancy and productivity for peregrine falcon and gyrfalcon along with information on monitoring sites and the principal investigators as specified in the file ReadMe_Arctic-falcons-monitoring-data.txt. Arctic falcons monitoring data - AFSG 2020.xlsx contains the same data in Microsoft Excel format. The file named AFSG-MonitoringSites-with-data.png provides an overview of the 24 monitoring sites described in Franke et al. (2020) with indication of which datasets are included here. Please note that: The dataset contains information on sample size (number of nesting territories surveyed in each monitoring site and year) for some areas only; for areas without sample size more than 10 territories were usually surveyed. However, for interpreting the data, potential users may need to consult the principal investigators for the specific monitoring sites. The dataset lists the principal investigators (and contact details) as respective “data owners”; in addition to the Creative Commons License 4.0 specifications covering this data upload, potential data users are strongly encouraged to contact the data owners prior to using or interpreting the data – for consent and possible co-authorship.

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    Some features of the sea ice environment. Marine areas seasonally or permanently covered by sea ice are a globally unique habitat. Ice edges and open water areas favour wind-driven mixing of the seawater that enhances local production and can create biological hotspots. Adapted from Eamer et al. (2013). STATE OF THE ARCTIC MARINE BIODIVERSITY REPORT - <a href="https://arcticbiodiversity.is/marine" target="_blank">Chapter 2</a> - Page 20 - Box Fig 2.1

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    Regional differences are more pronounced in the insectivore guild (Figure 3-24). Although diversity of waders was moderate in the East Asian–Australasian Flyway, 88% (15 of 17) of taxa with known trends were declining—the largest proportion of any group. Both short-term (the last 15 years) and long-term (more than 30 years) trends were available for 157 taxa. Trends were unchanged over the two time periods for 80% of taxa, improved for 11% and worsened for 9%.. STATE OF THE ARCTIC TERRESTRIAL BIODIVERSITY REPORT - Chapter 3 - Page 56 - Figure 3.24

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    Number of non-native plant taxa that have become naturalised across the Arctic. No naturalised non-native taxa are recorded from Wrangel Island, Ellesmere Land – northern Greenland, Anabar-Olenyok and Frans Josef Land. Modified from Wasowicz et al. 2020 STATE OF THE ARCTIC TERRESTRIAL BIODIVERSITY REPORT - Chapter 3 - Page 32 - Figure 3.4